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View From the Valley: You Say SaaS-Hole Like it’s a Bad Thing

View From the Valley: You Say SaaS-Hole Like it’s a Bad Thing

Customer Retention

By Kevin Goldberg

Recently All Things D published an article titled, “Don’t Be a SaaS-Hole: How Silicon Valley Evolved Itself Into an Era of Zero Customer Service” written by FuzeBox CEO, Jeff Cavins. If you’re too lazy to read the post, Cavins states the rise of the SaaS industry is to blame for the decline in customer service. Obviously, this is an overall gist, but you get the point.

Cavins is even so bold to claim Zendesk, the extremely popular customer service tool, hurts customer regard by automating many of the mundane tasks. Sure, I’ll admit it’s less human interaction. But I’m sure if we polled customers, they’d much rather receive an email easily solving the issue than be on the phone with an outsourced call center employee. You know what’s better than feeling “special” because of a human touch? Not needing support in the first place.

SaaS companies dispense technology to solve this very problem. Rather than spend money on costly manual support, increasing self-service and simplifying the user experience should be a higher priority. If the proper tech is used, there shouldn’t be a need for human support. If a customer doesn’t encounter any problems I doubt we’d hear complaints from users about the lack of human interaction.

I’d also like to point out the irony of Cavins piece. Though FuzeBox does have a support call center with actual people on the phone (albeit in Holland), they still rely heavily on an FAQ page and extensive help forums. For someone who disagrees with promoting self-service adoption, it seems like his company encourages it.

FuzeBox may have had some bad experiences with customer support because their current methods of non-manual support are antiquated and need work. FAQ-you pages, forums, and tutorial videos take you away from the task at hand. Nobody wants to keep switching tabs on their browser to complete their duty – they should be able to receive instant help showing them what to do as they’re doing it. There are better tools out there to increase self-service among your users, in a way they prefer. WalkMe is one of these tools, a simpler and more convenient option.

People would rather use an ATM than enter a bank branch to get their money from a teller. Is the banking industry losing the customer service battle too? Does anyone really care?

Dear Mr. Cavins, if you’d like to check out WalkMe, I’ll personally come to your headquarters and give you a live demo. How’s that for human touch?

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Kevin Goldberg